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tug of war

Haslital Highland Festival

Tug O' War

Obair-sgioba

The rope-pulling competition originated from ancient ceremonies and ritual acts. Evidence of ritual origins has been found in Burma, India, Borneo, Korea, Hawaii, Congo, New Zealand and New Guinea. At that time, rope-pulling served as a symbol of the struggle between good and evil. Tug-of-war later developed into a sporting competition. A wall drawing in the tomb of Merera-ku in Sakkara (Egypt) refers to this. In ancient Greece (from about 500 BC), tug-of-war was practised mainly as training for other sports. In the 12th century, tug-of-war competitions were held at the court of the Chinese emperor, and in the 13th and 14th centuries also in Mongolia and Turkey. In Western Europe, tug-of-war can only be traced back to about 1000; in Scandinavian and Germanic heroic sagas, which report on "vigorous games". In the 15th and 16th centuries, tug-of-war appeared in France and Great Britain. Towards the end of the 19th century, the sport became organised. At first, individual clubs were formed, later associations. Tug-of-war was initially regarded as an athletics discipline. The Swiss Tug-of-War Federation is the umbrella organisation of tug-of-war players in Switzerland, with the cantonal federations of Aargau, Appenzell, Lucerne, Obwalden and Nidwalden, St. Gallen, Thurgau. The Central President is Bruno Bischof. There are 25 tug-of-war clubs in Switzerland and a large national team with all weight categories. Participation in the tug-of-war competition at the Haslital Highland Festival is open to all teams. Simply register your club, your company or a team of friends using this form. 

Participation in the tug-of-war competition at the Haslital Highland Festival is open to all teams. Simply register your club, your company or a team of friends using this form. 

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